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for years in the economy, and even our environment. as increased use of natural gas has reduced co2 emissions in the united states in 1992 levels. since 1990, the industry has invested more than $252 billion in improving the environmental performance of our products, our facilities, and our operations. between 2000-2010, the amount of industry investment for technologies to reduce greenhouse gases was $71 billion. compare that to the $43 billion spent by the federal government over that same time. compared to all other industries combined, which were just slightly larger than what our industry invested. u.s. refiners have invested more than $137 billion since 1990 in technologies to produce even cleaner fuels and meet the growing variety of state and federal mandates. it complete transitions compared to gasoline is estimated to have resulted in the reduction of tailpipe emissions by cars and light duty trucks, the equivalent of taking 164 million cars off the road. and through increased efficiency, we are doing much more with less. america uses about half as much energy today to pro
's not only bad for the economy, but hurt the environment as well. "varney & company" is about to begin. karen anjeremiah. they don't know it yet, but they' gonna fall in love, get married, have a couple of kids, [ children laughing ] move to the country, and live a long, happy life together where they almost never fight about money. [ dog barks ] because right after they get married, they'll find some retirement people who are paid on salary, not commission. they'll get straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> good morning, "varney & company," viewers. today is monday, january 7th and gerard depardieu, well, he's welcomed to russia with open arms and here, we're going to welcome with you open arms, with sandra smith and on the floor of the new york stock exchange, of course, nicole petallides. hey, you remember the cash for clunkers, that 2009 government program that gave people money, a the lot of money to buy more fuel efficient cars if they traded in the old gas guzzlers, as i
. where do you see this going? you talk about ticket prices going up a minimum 10%. in this environment it could go up more than that, couldn't it? >> absolutely. no question about it. the reality is if we don't have the seats out there, what is left will be exceeded by the demand and that means it going to go up. the other challenge, we have the regional unquote airlines. you have to pay probably three quarters of a million dollars to get trained just to get the privilege of riding as a copilot and living in newark and getting paid $30,000 a year. that doesn't encourage a lot of new entrants. >> neil: i guess not. michael boyd on all things flying or in this case not flying. i think abe lincoln just turned in his grave. nancy pelosi now using an amendment he all but inspired to bury us all. i'm william devane. ♪ i wish my patients could see what i see. ♪ that over time, having high cholesterol and any of these risk factors can put them at increased risk for plaque buildup inheir arteries. so it's even more important to lower their cholesterol, and that's why, when diet and exercise
the time. >> let's talk about this. the president wants a legacy of environment, gun laws, energy, is he going to get this or trapped in this debate over budgets and taxes and spending cuts? >> the budget, tax and spending, not so much on the tax but when history looks at what happened in the deal on the fiscal cliff, a lot of positives there. the 99% of the people get permanent tax cuts. that is a big deal if you're president of the united states. or even in congress. 1% 0 going to pay more. i would say certainly that's the right policy. so maybe it's not so bad. the problem is that the process was like this permanent divorce court. and you just could not unravel in any meaningful way what's going on, what's going to happen and so you have the brigade of biden and mitch commonly coming in -- mitch mcconnell coming in at the last minute. >> zpwhr and is it in everyone's interests to get something done, the republicans need a legacy to reshape their image or just committed to try to block the president, gloria, at all costs? >> i think they're going to be blocking. and look, the tax issue
competitive environment from which to go out and compete around the world and win. host: one thing we heard leading up to discussions late last year is that some type of certainty was needed from decisions made. did the people you represent find the guest: certainty there is some of it. much is to be done because long- term overhang is still serious. nobody believes that our current spending course is sustainable. we have made promises that cannot be paid for. maybe not tomorrow or five years from now, but down the road changes need to be made. you're seeing this at the state level where governors and in both parties and legislative bodies are coming together. watch illinois right now, they are struggling with their pension debt, but at the national level we have not had the success yet that some of the states of had. host: looking at spending federally, what has to be guest::the first quarter this year is one that debate will take place. you have the debt ceiling, a continuing resolution. at the end of march, the year is half over. did you have sequestration mandated. those are all intertw
to be in this environment? what kind of year do you expect it to be? >> we don't have price on the dow, but we continue to look at more domestic-facing companies and industries, so consumer finance are big parts of both portfolios. we think housing continues to improve, consumer continues to delever, monetary policy remains supportive, so stock-pickers, we own redwood trust, which is a mortgage reit investment jumbo. we own carmax. they invented the used car superstore, lots of growth left there. and then a final stock would be ko colfax, which we do a great job as the vascular system for the global economy. they build large fluid systems for petrochemical companies, energy companies, as the economy comes in, as industrial production comes back, they're well positioned. so, we're pretty constructive on the asset class, particularly because a lot of people don't seem to be all that constructive on the asset class. >> steve sax, what about you? where are you seeing the flow? what are investors particularly grav stating towards these days? >> it's till equities and all of last year, credential the first c
, these are women who have either come out of this environment, out of an urban center in particular. we have our own struggles in the rural parts of america. we need to bring these things to the discussion. that is what we need to do. i do not think we will find solutions to the questions that the caller had until we get those people living with the struggles of the table. that means more women, more african-americans, more hispanics, more men and women of color. i feel strongly that we need more women in this discussion. we're still sitting at 20% of congress. we have a long way to go. host: caller in richmond, democrats line. caller: i was wondering how we will ever get equal pay when states like virginia have the right to work law and they can fire you for any reason. and the company i work for, if you discuss what you make to another employee, you can get fired. guest: it is about laws. laws are made by elected officials. who is representing us at the state legislature and in congress matters. we can overturn right to work laws. and we can pass it will pay laws. we need the right people to s
it to other people. be careful about your environment. bring purell with you restaurants. if you start to get the symptoms, stay home. >> that's a big part of it, isn't it? >> we were doing this report how it's $10 billion will be lost in people who call in sick because they have the flu, but what if people are coming into work who don't feel very well and suddenly just how easy is it to give it to somebody else? >> that's one of biggest problems, it's so contagious right now and the strains that are out there are so contagious and severe, that if you have symptoms and you go to work, there's a very good likelihood you'll give it to other people. and it doesn't feel good when you give it to friends and family. if you are sick, don't go to work and don't go to school. stay home, drink a lot of soup and tea and catch up on dvr. >> because of the severity of the situation, i was shocked to hear this, the archdiocese of boston and they feel they have a health emergency is telling priests they can suspend distribution of communion and alter sign of peace. and the shocking fact, the average desk is
and suing each other? >> yeah, not suing each other, but in a very, messy policy environment, and i just want to add one thing to this, and i don't know whether we disagree on this, but you see this more and more frequently that the administration, precisely because it knows that congress won't do anything, makes policy by official announcements of law enforcement, so we're going to have our own de facto dream act which congress refuses to enact by administrative law enforcement. that's very clear example of the dynamics here. you might see the same thing in drug enforcement, not going to enforce it, period, because congress won't enact a law to that effect. i find that sort of to go much beyond the ordinary exercise of administrative and executive discretion in law enforcement. it's policymaking by law enforcement which is to my mind a very, very -- in the teeth of congressional statutes to the contrary, i there are real policy difficulties with that, but there are also real constitutional problems with that. it's just sort of one more sign off dysfunction. >> not the way things are sup
in afghanistan? thank you. >> the interment of the -- environment of the narcotrafficker forces in uncertainty. when they raise an orchard or vineyard and turns it into a poppy field -- when he is not sure what is learned happened to him or his family, they turn to narcotics. it takes three months to grow it. it does not need refrigeration or economic integration, nothing. if we see an increased degree of uncertainty, we would probably see more poppy cultivation. it would be listed economic activities. -- illicit economic activities. the leadership [indiscernible] in the areas where the economy is thriving, we have seen a reduction of narcotics and cultivation of the poppy. in areas where we see most of the fighting, that is where most of the poppies are grown. >> let me close with a final question. jim used a number of statistics. one that struck me is i have the right to a 52% of the afghan population thought the country is going on in the right direction. my question to each of you, what is your view? is the country going in the right direction and are you optimistic or pessimistic as we lo
up a much more friendly environment to talk about the issues. host: fawn johnson, correspondent with national journal, we're focusing the "washington journal" this morning on issues surrounding immigration. later on, we'll talk to some reporters as well as folks on both sides of the issue right here on n washington, d.c. haour first phone call is from ryan in texas on our democrats line. hi, ryan. caller: yes, how you doing? host: good. caller: i would like to say, they're not going to enforce the immigration laws. some of the people that i know out with these charges, that they're not going to follow immigration rules, just some of these guys that got these crack charges and trying to get back to their families. host: you're talking about drug charges? ok. let's go to trevor in arlington, virginia, on our independent line. hi, trevor. caller: hello. how you doing? host: good morning. caller: basically the premise of my question is, you know, everybody involved in deciding what's going to happen with immigration, you would think they would have to be thinking, how much more reve
you would look at the material? >> we are all products of our experience, of our environment where we come from. i have been tempered by that experience about war. what war means, the consequences, who has to fight it. all of that experience is part of me and how i look at policy, how i look at our foreign policy, how i look at our military policy, how i judge consequences, how the world sees us, their trust in our purpose, in our power. no question that much of the questioning i've done about iraq even before we went in was conditioned tempered by that experience in vietnam. and whatever i will do in my life, whether it's in politics or outside, those experiences shape me just like anyone who has gone through war, those experiences shape you very much. one of the things it does is it makes you less inclined i suspect to jump into war. it's easy to get into war, not very easy to get out as evidenced by the johnson tapes. and you need to think through these things. diplomacy is critically important especially in the world we flive today. i think something else is important here and cer
students back into a peaceful and safe environment. many businesses and groups are promoting the love we have in newtown as well as fundraising to help those in most need. neighbors here and elsewhere are reaching out to each other to provide support, services, a listening ear, a should tore cry on. i have had the honor to meet people from similar events in aurora, columbine and virginia tech and hope they can teach ugh ways to help heal our families in town. i do not want to be someone sharing my experience and consoling another parent next time. i do not want there to be a next time. the sandy took promises the start of our change. it's a promise we make for our community, but we need a nation of communities to join us to meet -- i don't know yet what these changes are. i come with no preconceiveded agenda. i do believe there's no quick fix single action, but instead a multitude of interlinked actions that are needed. i love newtown. and i love sandy hook. my family chose to live here and we stand by our choice. one tragedy cannot undermine this town's spirit and love. it is already st
of statistics and the economic environment that we're in today? >> now, i wish i had an answer to that one. you know, i've said before that there is a highway into poverty today, and there's not even a sidewalk out. and there's very little, once you get there, and you are so there, that can be done to help you at this point in time. because there aren't the jobs, there aren't the resources, there aren't the credit limits that there used to be. so the real key here is, what can you do out there right now to prevent yourself from going into poverty? and i always say that there are three things. three things that if we could just learn to ask ourselves, before we spend a penny. number one, is it a need or a want? obviously, if it's a need, you have to buy it. if it's a want, can you just walk away? you have to get as much pleasure in saving as you do spending. this era of spending, spending, spending has got to go. and last but not least, we all have to get as much pleasu in saving as we do spending. so, you know, it's very interesting. >> suze, what if you're one of those people who's unemployed.
a clunker for the environment. they say the program produced tons of unnecessary waste while doing little to curb greenhouse gas emissions. the emphasis was on car shredding and not recycling even though they say cars are almost completely recyclable. if they had recycled just metal and plastic it would have saved 24 million barrels of oil. department of transportation deemed cash for clung ears success. >> welfare recipients are taking out cash at new york strip clubs liquor stores and x-rated shops and presumably spending it there. they looked at 200 million or ebt records. the food stamp programs bans purchase of booze and lottery tickets with ebt card but cash assistance and is intended to spent on housing and utilities and household necessities can be obtained at atms. a senior fellow says, quote. i don't blame riptsd, if you are poor, its crummy life and you wanted to have a drink or see a naked woman. i blame the people who are in charge of this. >> a massachusetts democratic governor is downplaying the news his state cannot locate 19,000 people who have either been receiving welfa
around? >> i believe the atmosphere has changed. the environment u i think there's a good chance that we can push a positive agenda forward. if this doesn't do it, if this newtown tragedy doesn't do it, i'm not sure what will. we just need to search our hearts and our souls and ask if there's not more we can do to prevent this sort of thing. and i think most mirns sense that. most americans are willing to think about some new ways of approaching this. of course, we need some political leadership and some leaders to encourage us to come together on this. >> congressman, you're from north carolina and polling says that the public is understanding it is moving toward more of a sensible gun control kind of country. but what about your colleagues in the congress? are you hearing or sensing any movement there? one of their colleagues was shot and we didn't see any movement there. why should we feel something would be different this time? >> well, i have to say that congress is more polarized and more stuck on talking points than i've ever seen in my time there. but i do believe if you just sto
problem or not. they get very upset because they don't. they have been destroyed by our food environment. i think these studies will come together and show that we have a couple addictive things, just like cigarettes. which sounded crazy a long time ago that people would say junk food would be linked, parallel to the tobacco court rulings. but, you know what, we're going to get there. i'm sure of it. >> well, you know, be prepared to hear from the corn refiners association. >> soda pop industry, come at me, too. tell me you're not selling complete poison. some nutritional value in pepsi. something in orange soda adds value to our diets and our body. don't look at me. what's wrong with you? >> let's all go out after the show and have some twizlers and talk this through. >> these are the things we have been eating for decades and drinking for decades and then we have an obesity crisis and we can't make the link? >> it's very possible the science will take us there. we do know where the science is for sure which is a diet on whole fresh fruits and vegetables primarily with small amounts of
cliff was a friendly family discussion compared to this hatfield/mccoy environment that's unfolding with regard to spending. >> so you think this whole story is going to have some real heart-stopping moments for the markets? >> i think there will be huge consequences. recall that in the summer of 2011 the last time we faced this that the dow went down 1800 points in july and august. now, granted there were some other issues in europe that were a concern. but we could see some serious consequences as a result of these -- this inability to have a discussion on spending cuts. >> i know you're a bond specialist, but apple reducing their iphone orders and so forth. apple fell 3.5% today. $18 to 501. is this apple reduction in ipad orders, is this symbolic of an economy that's getting weaker? >> well, i think so. i think -- well, we have heard some people say that, yes, it's part apple. the company. but also, i think it is symbolic of just people not having enough certainty of what kind of money they will have in the future to spend on items such as what apple offers. >> at the same time,
and drug dealers, i lived two blocks away from her and my whole environment was drug violence, drugs, violence, and chaos. and that's all i knew, but when i met laura, my whole life changed and it changed for the better. >> mike: did you have a hard time thinking this lady is actually going to take me to eat and she's going to walk in central park with me and take me to a place and buy me the first steak i've ever had in my life? what were you thinking as a 11-year-old boy in the same sweat pants that you know you where all the time because that's all you had. >> i thought that she was a god send. i thought that someone was looking over me to send me an angel and that's what i believe. i believe the lord sent me an angel when he sent me laura. >> mike: no question, as i read the story and it's just so compelling, laura, did you expect this to turn into a 26 year relationship? at what point did you realize this is not just me taking a kid out to lunch? >> well, you know i never could imagine that when we met that day that maurice would not only change my life, but i would change his l
, that it would be a much safer environment? >> i -- i absolutely -- i wouldn't consider carrying one if i didn't feel like i could do it safely. >> but what if you had a parent who objected to it? what position would that put you in? >> well, in the state of utah, a parent doesn't have to know about it. teachers can carry a firearm and nobody ever -- they've been doing it for 12 years. i've found out more and more about teachers that do. and employee -- >> the teachers have had guns in schools for 12 years in utah? >> yes, yes. it's been legal to do that for 12 years. >> and parents haven't known about it? >> right. you don't have to tell if you're a concealed weapon holder. >> do you think parents have a right to know? for instance, if my child was in your classroom, do you think that i would have a right to know that there is a firearm in that classroom? >> well, if -- if -- i personally would feel okay with any of the teachers, teachers i know, any teach they're i've ever met. they have the -- >> but i'm talking about the parents. >> right, right. >> i want to focus. the parents are droppin
's happened, he made it clear he's not backing down in 2013. >> and the difficult environment of divided government, we stand ready to work with both parties. but we will not sugar coat or shy away from the disagreements that will inevidentbly arise. >> well, you might be putting the debt ceiling fight at the top of the list of those disagreements. we shall see. he suggested, it's a perfect opportunity to deal with issues left out of the deal on the fiscal cliff. the president of the u.s. chamber of commerce, tom d donohue. let me start with, many business leaders do not want to see the republicans use this as leverage. where are you on this? >> i believe that fundamentally, if the country does not deal with its debt, that debt that is driven by entitlements, 10,000 people a day retiring, if we don't do it, it will consume all of the nation's income. and we have to find a way to do a big deal. it's there. make it work. where we come on the issue of what should stimulate it, of course we know that sequestration and other issues will require us to work together, when you get down to defaul
with a lot of self-confidence and comfortable in his own skin. in this town, any political environment, you have to get to know the other side and empathize with them. it's not one of his greatest ranks so far. >> you point that out today in your piece, learning how to smooz could be a difference between a good and great presidency for president obama. who f how do you think he's doing so far? >> it's a struggle for him. we saw with the negotiations with republicans specifically speaker boehner, granted the republicans aren't giving an inch and they are very hard-headed and aren't willing to accommodate. but past presidents have had just as tough if not tougher rivals to go up against. instead of running towards boehner and running towards his enemies up on the hill getting to know him. the small favors in politics, visits to the white house, sitting down for drinks, invitations on air force one, those are all small things and to the general public seem petty but they mean a lot in relationships. and the president was very good in springfield illinois, if you talked to people that worked wi
and suburban environments particularly. because what we're looking at in montana is not quite the same as what we may be looking at in chicago or places around the nation. >> cynthia -- >> what do people need them for in montana? what do people need them for in montana? i grew up in alabama, in deepest, reddest alabama. my father loved hunting. i grew up with shotguns and rifles in the house. he never -- it was a rural area. he never felt the need to have an assault weapon. the deer weren't armed. so why do you need an assault weapon? i don't understand -- [ overlapping speakers ] >> i did not say assault weapon. >> why do you need one? >> i did not say an assault weapon. what i'm saying is when you're putting a solution in place we're still going to have to be mindful or the compliancy in chicago and new york city versus people in the big west. people such as residents in montana or the dakotas. we're going to have to be mindful. i'm not saying i'm defending people having assault weapons. those are weapons of war and they too often get in the hands of people that hurt folks throughout america
the submarine n that environment to have the largest insurance company in the world that had written savings protection contracts to thousands, hundreds of thousands of american households and to a bunch of state and local governments to have that inconstitution fail in that environment our judgment would have been catastrophic. >> all right. who's right? >> dishonesty of that statement we saw in the testimony from congress. aig was not saved to protect savings accounts. it was saved so that aig could make its payments that alexis would describe earlier. to the largest too big to fail bank that's made the reckless counter party bet risks on aig and the taxpayer was footing the bill. look, even tim geithner himself in some ways acknowledge that was an unfair thing when he authorized his people to negotiate with the banks to try to have a discount, not 100 cents on the dollar buying securities at a time were worth less than half that amount. it was a half hearted, you know, just terrible effort that it didn't go anywhere. >> we were talking about right before those clips the loss of faith in s
is to continue to keep people at home in an environment that they feel most comfortable with as opposed to an institution. so we measure in our organization readmission rates. i mentioned that we've reduced 26% readmission rates. the goal there is to continue to encourage people to stay home and be able to take care of them at home. that helps with that waste in that regard. the ability to not have duplicated diagnostic services are an example of that. and someone overlooking the whole individual has that observation as opposed to the silos. >> but we go back to the medicare for a second? >> uh-huh. >> where is that waste, and what have you seen as an organization the waste being and how would you suggest that that be tackled? >> okay. um, the waste is across the platform. i mean, i think if you this week there was an article in "the new york times" around fraud and some of the activities that are going on in that area. so fraud's a component of that. but for us as an organization the largest waste is the lack of integrated care. and what that means is duplication of services and where
environment. after you all go off the air, i'll go on set. the lights. they don't tell you that you get a free chemical peel with every bone marrow transplant. my skin is very sensitive. we have to see how it reacts to studio lights. my vision is still a little blurry. that is the next step. >> robin, you look amazing on camera this morning. your weight is up a little bit. when do you get back to normal day-to-day routine for you? >> you looked great in your tux in las vegas, i was watching you. but, what happens now is after i go through this dry run, my doctors will sit down with me again and we'll evaluate where i am. we're talking now, a matter of weeks, not months. i should be back some time in february. now i have a date in mind that's very personal and very important to me. but i will ultimately listen to what my doctors, of course what my doctors say and what they recommend. we have to remember, we're in the height of flu season. george. you'll talk to one of my doctors, gail, and rich, in a bit. >> robin, you have been champing at the bit. recovery takes so long. we have been e-mailin
car, try to save gas and help the environment and they'll still tax you. you really can't make this stuff up. we'll deal with it next and look at this quote. [ male announcer ] at scottrade, we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive learning, plus, in-branch seminars at over 500 locations, where our dedicated support teams help you know more so your money can do more. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our teams have the information you want when you need it. it's anothereason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping you know it can be hard to lbreathe, and how that feels.e, copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphy
returns, what you're telling clients for the next three to five years? >> in this environment, we're actually asking our clients to think about three things. first we're going to have low interest rates for awhile. so they need to adjust their expected returns. so in a low interest rate environment we're going to have lower returns across all asset classes. second, we're telling our clients that as they think about the lower returns in the context of their portfolios, they also need to recognize that we are going to have volatility from incremental policy on a global basis. whether it's in the u.s., europe, japan or emerging market countries. we are expecting that policy, whether it's monetary policy adjustments, fiscal policy, it will all be incremental. and that will create market pressure because it won't be at a pace that the markets would like to see. so that will introduce volatility. and it's not something our clients should try to trace. they should look over the horizon and invest for the long run. >> looking at the long run, three to five-year term outlook if you look at
oh, well either you destroy your community and destroy your environment or you have no energy. that's absolutely not true. and i mean can you imagine sitting in a movie theater and then watching an orwellian advertisement from an industry saying everything about this my movie you're about to watch is untrue. this is how lead-footed they've been in actually attacking this. the truth is they know they're contaminating people. i don't think there is any way to make this drilling safe. there is certainly no historical or scientific context for making this type of drilling safe. >> it is something that you address in "gas land" no doubt. but josh fox, thanks for coming in and weighing on your documentary and the new movie. >>> next up with the big three, america's longest wars. how will history judge president obama's handling of iraq and afghanistan? you are watching "weekends with alex witt." [ male announcer ] house rule number 14. a great cup of coffee should be easy as one, two... well, just one. new single serve cafe collections from maxwell house now available for use in the keuri
only voted for obama. that kind of sets up a much more friendly environment to talk about the issues. host: fawn johnson, correspondent with national journal, we're focusing the "washington journal" this morning on issues surrounding immigration. later on, we'll talk to some reporters as well as folks on both sides of the issue right here on n washington, d.c. our first phone call is from ryan in texas on our democrats line. hi, ryan. caller: yes, how you doing? host: good. caller: i would like to say, they're not going to enforce the immigration laws. some of the people that i know out with these charges, that they're not going to follow immigration rules, just some of these guys that got these crack charges and trying to get back to their families. host: you're talking about drug charges? ok. let's go to trevor in arlington, virginia, on our independent line. hi, trevor. caller: hello. how you doing? host: good morning. caller: basically the premise of my question is, you know, everybody involved in deciding what's going to happen with immigration, you would think they would have t
in the environment, you learn every square inch of the beautiful everglades. >> reporter: these fields of saw grass and marshy woods are also home to 68 threatend or endangered species. birds, hundreds of alligators, and something you can't see, tens of thousands of burmese pythons. the snakes are foreign predators devouring the native animals that belong here. they can eat bears, you say, even panthers? deer? >> deer, hogs, and smaller animals. >> reporter: which is why on saturday the state of florida kicked off what it calls the python challenge. a month-long snake hunt with prizes for those who catch and kill pythons. 1,000 people have signed up, most of them amateurs like sean and kate hicks of georgia. >> we have zero experience, zero hunting experience, and i've never killed anything ever. we'll see. i don't know. >> reporter: sean heard about the challenge and signed up as a christmas present for his wife. >> we brought a big 18-inch machete, knife. so -- >> reporter: do you know how to use it? >> no, never used it in my life. i assume i swing it real hard. rep
or attempts on his life three times and operates in a very difficult political environment and has an insurgency going. so i think if you put all of those factors in play, suddenly you get a better measure of the kind of what he has facing him. i'm not saying that president karzai is a perfect leader. but what i'm saying is we should try to understand that context and i think it can allow us to deal better with a leader like him? >> in your book you write this about the afghan president. hamid karzai was a man of strong emotions and loyalties rubbed raw sometimes to cynicism by long years and slowed to trust but chited to relationships. you spent a lot of travel time with him. bottom line, is he doing what he needs to do? >> well, i'm not on the ground to junl the current activities but i think he's doing what he thinks he has to do, and that is navigate a western coalition that is very skeptical of the mission and desirous of pulling out, dealing with a taliban insurgency and then internal politics. so i think if you really look at his challenge, he's walking a tight rope in a sti
about the agenda for the 113th congress and the political environment this year. this is just under an hour. host: in our sunday roundtable two veterans of capitol. john freehery, longtime republican strategist and staffer to dennis hastert and jim manley, who worked for senators kennedy and reid. let's begin with the words of bob woodward it avoid the crisis next time try dell getting the job. players used their staff as messagers and backen but never empowered them to solve the problem. could the staffers have done better? guest: as a former staffer you always think that you know all the solutions but it is the members of congress and senators that have to face election. it is a lot easier to get in a back room without worrying about constituents and solve these problems. i know a lot of staffers would be mortified with what bob woodward had to say. guest: it didn't and it didn't work in the debt limit debacle. i have a lot of respect for bob woodward. i'm not not quite sure i understood what that was getting at. staffers can only go so far and it is up to members to legislate. an
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